ACTION CARBONE SOLIDAIRE

Our projects

The GoodPlanet Foundation is committed to a fundamentally united approach, and its offsetting projects are intended to combat both poverty and global warming

Solar cooker in Bolivia © Florence de Maupeou - Laure Bruma

Access to Renewable Energy

These projects consist of promoting renewable energy as a substitute for non-renewable energy sources (fuel wood, kerosene, natural gas, etc.) in order to :

  • Providing families with free renewable energy for cooking and heating ;
  • Improving the quality of life of women and children by alleviating the burden of collecting fuel (distance, time and weight) and lessening the health risks (respiratory problems and indoor air pollution) ;
  • Limit CO2 emissions into the atmosphere and prevent deforestation ;
  • In India, using animal dung as quality compost as a substitute for chemical fertilisers.

1. DISTRIBUTION OF SOLAR COOKERS IN BOLIVIA AND PERU
Solar cookers use simple technology that captures solar radiation (sunlight) to generate heat for cooking. It can reach a temperature of 150 to 200° C and enables even and risk-free cooking, even without supervision. 20 minutes of sunlight per hour is sufficient to ensure its performance, meaning that it is suitable for a wide variety of geographical areas and can be used all year round.

2. PRODUCTION OF BIOGAS AND VERMICOMPOST IN INDIA
Biogas is a genuine alternative to fuel poverty and is used for cooking in rural and farming areas. This gas, which has very low CO2 emissions, is produced by the fermentation of animal waste without oxygen in a sealed reservoir. This technology also enables such waste to be properly managed and used as fertiliser for family farming. Eight tonnes of organic fertiliser are produced each year by one vermicompost unit. The unit is usually maintained by women and all income from it is paid to them.

Composting and waste valorisation

These projets are aimed at coping with a major issue in big cities and promoting a best waste management, in order to :

  • Improving the treatment and management of waste in order to curtail global warming and meet local health needs ;
  • Providing stable jobs for casual waste sorters ;
  • Producing a natural fertiliser to reduce farmers’ dependence on chemical fertilisers.

AFRICOMPOST PROGRAMME IN MADAGASCAR, TOGO AND CAMEROUN
Waste management is a major issue in cities, and the anaerobic digestion (without oxygen) of the organic materials contained in household waste has a significant effect on climate change due to the emission of large quantities of methane, a powerful greenhouse gas. These two problems are being tackled simultaneously by the development of organic waste composting units in 6 African cities. The sorting and composting of household waste improves local management of the waste while reducing its impact on the environment. In addition, the production of compost boosts the development of local agriculture and the creation of direct employment.

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